By user812786


2017-03-27 18:06:33 8 Comments

I was reading an article which included the sentence:

He claimed that the letter was satire.

I scoffed and wanted to exclaim, "satire against what?" -- but I'm not sure that's the correct or most appropriate phrasing.

Ngram viewer indicates that "satire of X" is most popular (between "against", "of" and "for"), but is one more correct than another? Are there meaningful differences for when I would use one vs. another?

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